Welcome to St. Columba United

We worship  together as
St. John’s/Perley Memorial/St. Columba:

Sundays in Grand Forks at 10:00a.m.

920 Central Ave.,
Grand Forks, BC

Our minister, Rev. Kim Horwood leads the worship services.
All are welcome to join us for worship, music, and fellowship.

 


 

Our building and property in Greenwood, BC is for sale.
For more information please see this website > > >


 

A Bit of History of St.Columba

Source: MemoryBC— BC Conference Archives

Old St. Columba erected by Presbyterian missionaries in 1900

Greenwood Pastoral Charge in Kootenay Presbytery began as the result of Presbyterian and Methodist activity. The Kettle River Mission had been opened in 1890 and reopened in 1893 by the Presbyterian Church; by 1896 mission stations had been opened up at both Greenwood and Midway. By 1920 Greenwood and Midway had been combined into one field. The congregation at Greenwood was called St. Columba’s Presbyterian Church and has continued as the central point in Greenwood charge to the present. After union the congregation was called St. Columba’s United Church.

Methodist Church erected in 1899 and closed in 1922

The Methodists opened work in Greenwood in 1899 which was variously combined with activity carried on at nearby Phoenix. In 1925 the local Methodist and Presbyterian bodies entered church union without a vote. Since union, Greenwood Pastoral Charge has consisted of various congregations and preaching points, including Midway, Kettle Valley, Beaverdell, Bridesville, Rock Creek and others. 

 

St. Columba United Church, 1959

PHOTOS: from Church in the Kootenays: The Story of The United Church of Canada in Kootenay Presbytery — Elsie G. Turnbull,  Published for Kootenay Presbytery United Church Women by Trail Times Limited, 1965

Greenwood and associated points entered The United Church of Canada without a vote in 1925. Rev. Wingate R. Walkinshaw had been in charge from 1922 and he remained until 1926 when he was succeeded by Andrew Walker. When the Dominion Copper Company closed its smelter Greenwood became a ghost of its former self and its population dropped to a few hundred. Lumbering on a small scale has been the only industry, although briefly re-opening of the Mother Lode property and the reworking of the mines in Phoenix have increased the population to one thousand. During the second World War fourteen hundred Japanese brought a resurgence of life. Welcomed by the local residents these people proved good citizens and after they were free to leave some four hundred chose to make their homes in Greenwood. Today the town is small but thriving and the United Church has made it a centre for services in Midway, Rock Creek, Kettle Valley, Bridesville, and Beaverdell. A spanking new church, modern in its sharply-peaked A-design replaces the old St. Columba. Built of brown wood it has a white panel lighted by a stained glass cross on its facade. Standing amid old buildings dating from copper-boom days it symbolizes the aspirations of the inhabitants and the faith that the United Church has in the future of Greenwood.

from Church in the Kootenays: The Story of The United Church of Canada in Kootenay Presbytery — Elsie G. Turnbull,  Published for Kootenay Presbytery United Church Women by Trail Times Limited, 1965 

 

The Greenwood Pastoral Charge amalgamated with Boundary Pastoral Charge, becoming one of three congregations of that Charge. Due to declining membership, in 2017 the congregation decided to sell their building and property with the consent of Kootenay Presbytery and re-form its congregation in Midway, more central to the area it serves.